Lynchburg, VA

Local News

  • Large freshman class may result in housing adjustments at Virginia Tech
    The school year is inching closer and closer. At Virginia Tech, staff members are expecting the largest-ever incoming freshman class.It's a show of support for the university but could also result in housing troubles. Virginia Tech typically has about 9,300 residence spaces on campus.."It's a good problem to have because ... read more
    Source: WSLSPublished on 2017-07-21
  • Historic Vinton school reopens as lofts
    Two years ago, the Roanoke County Board of Supervisors voted to redevelop the historic Roland E. Cook School in a way that will not affect the charm of the neighborhood. The complete project was revealed to the public with a grand opening today."The bath and the walk-through closet off of ... read more
    Source: WSLSPublished on 2017-07-21
  • USPS closes Pulaski post office citing safety reasons
    People in southwest Virginia who tried to go to their local post office Thursday are feeling frustrated after they received an unwanted surprise. The United States Postal Service issued an emergency suspension in Pulaski, closing down the building for safety reasons. The post office will be closed starting Friday. Many ... read more
    Source: WSLSPublished on 2017-07-21
  • Navy SEAL monument dedicated in Virginia Beach
    Seventy-five years ago, the Navy SEALs, then known as the Scouts and Raiders, got their start in Virginia Beach.Until Thursday, there was no way to publicly honor the service and sacrifice of the elite fighting force.A Navy SEAL monument was unveiled at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront Thursday. The monument depicts ... read more
    Source: WSLSPublished on 2017-07-21
  • Texas man loses 230 pounds, joins the Army
    (KRBC) An Abilene, Texas man fulfilled his childhood dream after losing over 200 pounds in order to join the United States Army.William Guinn Jr. was officially sworn in to the Army during a ceremony that took place in Dallas on Thursday - a proud moment that's been over a year ... read more
    Source: WSLSPublished on 2017-07-21
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11 hours ago

Lynchburg Public Library

Escape Room 7/20Stay tuned to this album for pictures from our Summer 2017 Tween STEAM programs! 🙂 ... See MoreSee Less

Escape Room 7/20

#WeatherAware The temperatures are rising, especially Friday and Saturday this week! Be prepared.

Extreme heat and high humidity can be dangerous to anyone, but particularly to the elderly, infants, and young children, persons with disabilities and people on medication for chronic health problems. Here are some common sense tips for handling the heat:

Tips for Handling the Heat

Stay indoors and in air-conditioning as much as possible.
Use blinds or shades to block sunlight coming through windows that receive morning or afternoon sun.
Increase the amount of water and natural juices you drink regardless of your activity level; avoid beverages that contain alcohol, caffeine, and lots of sugar. [Note: If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.]
Avoid going out in the blazing heat, as much as possible.
Minimize the use of electric lights and heat-generating appliances, like ovens.
Wear lightweight, loose-fitting, clothing.
Eat light, cool, easy-to-digest foods, such as fruit or salads.
Check on family members, friends and neighbors.
If you or anyone you know needs emergency medical attention, call 9-1-1.

If you go outside in the heat…

Plan strenuous activities for early or late in the day when temperatures are cooler.
During heavy exercise, drink two or four glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool fluid each hour.
Take frequent breaks when working outdoors.
Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Also wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher.
At the first sign of heat illness (dizziness, weakness, headaches, nausea, muscle cramps), move to a cooler location, rest for a few minutes, and slowly drink a cool beverage.
Seek medical attention immediately if you do not feel better.
If the power goes out or air-conditioning is not available…
Stay on the lowest floor and out of the sunshine
Take cool baths or showers if you feel overheated; use cool towels
Keep a few bottles of water in your freezer. If the power goes out, move them to your refrigerator and keep the doors shut.
Do not direct the air flow of portable electric fans towards yourself when the room temperature is hotter than 90° F.
Consider going to an air-conditioned building, such as a cooling center, shopping mall, etc.

Do Not Leave Children in Cars

Even in cool temperatures, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly.
Even with the windows cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20° F within the first 10 minutes.
Anyone left inside is at risk for serious heat-related illnesses or even death. Children who are left unattended in parked cars are at greatest risk for heat stroke, and possibly death. When traveling with children, remember to do the following:
Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
To remind yourself that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled in, place the stuffed animal in the front with the driver.
When leaving your car, check to be sure everyone is out of the car. Do not overlook any children who have fallen asleep in the car.

Keeping Your Pets Cool

Any animal can suffer from the heat, particularly very young or very old animals, short nosed breeds of dogs (e.g. pugs, bulldogs), heavy coated cats and dogs, and pets who are overweight or have a medical condition.
Provide water and shelter from the sun at all times.
Restrict activity during extreme heat.
Never leave pets in parked vehicles. Even moderate heat rapidly increases and can kill the pet quickly.The temperatures are rising, especially Friday and Saturday this week! Be prepared. Visit www.weather.gov/heat for safety tips.
... See MoreSee Less

#WeatherAware The temperatures are rising, especially Friday and Saturday this week! Be prepared.

Extreme heat and high humidity can be dangerous to anyone, but particularly to the elderly, infants, and young children, persons with disabilities and people on medication for chronic health problems. Here are some common sense tips for handling the heat:

Tips for Handling the Heat

Stay indoors and in air-conditioning as much as possible.
Use blinds or shades to block sunlight coming through windows that receive morning or afternoon sun.
Increase the amount of water and natural juices you drink regardless of your activity level; avoid beverages that contain alcohol, caffeine, and lots of sugar. [Note: If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.]
Avoid going out in the blazing heat, as much as possible.
Minimize the use of electric lights and heat-generating appliances, like ovens.
Wear lightweight, loose-fitting, clothing.
Eat light, cool, easy-to-digest foods, such as fruit or salads.
Check on family members, friends and neighbors.
If you or anyone you know needs emergency medical attention, call 9-1-1.

If you go outside in the heat…

Plan strenuous activities for early or late in the day when temperatures are cooler.
During heavy exercise, drink two or four glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool fluid each hour.
Take frequent breaks when working outdoors.
Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Also wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher.
At the first sign of heat illness (dizziness, weakness, headaches, nausea, muscle cramps), move to a cooler location, rest for a few minutes, and slowly drink a cool beverage.
Seek medical attention immediately if you do not feel better.
If the power goes out or air-conditioning is not available…
Stay on the lowest floor and out of the sunshine
Take cool baths or showers if you feel overheated; use cool towels
Keep a few bottles of water in your freezer. If the power goes out, move them to your refrigerator and keep the doors shut.
Do not direct the air flow of portable electric fans towards yourself when the room temperature is hotter than 90° F.
Consider going to an air-conditioned building, such as a cooling center, shopping mall, etc.

Do Not Leave Children in Cars

Even in cool temperatures, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly.
Even with the windows cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20° F within the first 10 minutes.
Anyone left inside is at risk for serious heat-related illnesses or even death. Children who are left unattended in parked cars are at greatest risk for heat stroke, and possibly death. When traveling with children, remember to do the following: 
Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
To remind yourself that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled in, place the stuffed animal in the front with the driver.
When leaving your car, check to be sure everyone is out of the car. Do not overlook any children who have fallen asleep in the car.

Keeping Your Pets Cool

Any animal can suffer from the heat, particularly very young or very old animals, short nosed breeds of dogs (e.g. pugs, bulldogs), heavy coated cats and dogs, and pets who are overweight or have a medical condition.
Provide water and shelter from the sun at all times.
Restrict activity during extreme heat.
Never leave pets in parked vehicles. Even moderate heat rapidly increases and can kill the pet quickly.

Comment on Facebook

Can you guys find I Mist water machine to put down on Fridays cheers for Lynchburg Virginia down on the Percival's Island area. It would be a great help for those people who are going to get real hot down there.

I am so done with summer.

19 hours ago

Lynchburg Public Library

We had a great time at Paint and Sip! Did you attend? Share your art with us! ... See MoreSee Less

We had a great time at Paint and Sip! Did you attend? Share your art with us!

Tweens ages 9-12: our last Summer STEAM for Tweens programs are happening tomorrow, Thursday 7/20!! Join us at either 10:30 or 1:30 to see if you can "escape the library" in 30 minutes! Emily from Youth Services has devised a devious escape room, so get ready to work together, think hard, and have fun! Space is limited to 24 tweens per session, so please plan to arrive early and grab your nametag! 🙂 ... See MoreSee Less

Tweens ages 9-12: our last Summer STEAM for Tweens programs are happening tomorrow, Thursday 7/20!! Join us at either 10:30 or 1:30 to see if you can escape the library in 30 minutes! Emily from Youth Services has devised a devious escape room, so get ready to work together, think hard, and have fun! Space is limited to 24 tweens per session, so please plan to arrive early and grab your nametag! :)
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